Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Marana in Marana, AZ

Marana

Service Above Self

We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 AM
Nana's Kitchen
8225 N. Courtney Page Way
Marana, AZ  85741
United States of America
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Current Events
 
Marana Rotary Club has gone to virtual meeting to be safe from the Virus
Visitors are always welcome to the Marana Rotary Club
Please text to 520-909-9162  with  your name by 5:00 PM Monday
A text will be returned explaining How to join our virtual meeting
Marana Rotary Club is using ZOOM and it very easy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Speaker next week will be our own Bob Bishop   this will be interesting
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our speaker was our own Don Jorgensen about their trip to Antarctica
along with lots of photos of wild life and their experience of getting home
 
 
 
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
 
Clubs in District 5500 reaching out and offering help to their communities in need at a rapid pace with COVID-19 Emergency funds and at the same time rediscovering who we are.
 
In PDG’s Kirk Reed’s words, “In times of crisis we discover –or rediscover—who we are. Do we gripe and moan? Or do we dig deep to find inner strength? Do we feel sorry for ourselves? Or do we say, I can’t do everything, but I can do something for my community and my world.”
 
On April 3, 2020 Rotary District 5500 issued a challenge to local Rotary clubs in Southern Arizona. “You can receive a gift of $500 today from District if you want to help your communities and neighbors in times of crisis.”
Well, the clubs immediately responded AND at a rapid pace. The Rotary Clubs of District 5500 are truly PEOPLE OF ACTION and demonstrated compassion, caring and kindness as they moved quickly to extend help in their communities. Look what they did.
 
Ten Rotary clubs decided to invest in their local food banks and pantries coming from Benson, Coolidge, Globe, Green Valley, Oro Valley, SaddleBrooke Sunrise, Sierra Vista, Superior and Valle Verde. Each of these food banks, when adequately supplied, provides daily life support for families. Rotarians said, “We can help.”
 
Eleven Rotary clubs remembered their most vulnerable neighbors and donated to local missions, foundations, community centers,  schools and youth programs coming from the Rotary clubs of Bisbee, Casas Adobes,  Dove Mountain, Fort Yuma, Marana, Mountain Empire (Sonoita-Patagonia), Pantano, Rincon, SaddleBrooke, Sierra Vista Sunrise, and Yuma.  These investments by local Rotary clubs will impact thousands of lives.
 
Ten Rotary clubs filled a need of providing urgently needed supplies by making or purchasing supplies: face masks, latex gloves, sanitizer, wipes, toilet paper, disposable surgical robes and more. These supplies came from Casa Grande Daybreak, Douglas, Rio Rico, San Luis Frontera, Sierra Vista West, Somerton, Tucson, Tucson Presidio, Vail, Yuma Crossing.
 
The Kino Rotary club said thank you to first responders and emergency room staff by delivering lunches and dinners to hospitals, police and firefighters.
 
Two Rotary clubs connected kids and families to online learning by purchasing hot spots and data plans. These actions came from Tubac and Old Pueblo clubs.
 
Willcox Rotary made sure cultural activities continue by empowering the Wilcox Historic Theatre to offer art lessons, concerts and STEM program online.
 
Two Rotary clubs helped keep shelters open by responding to a sewer system crisis at a local shelter that caused 99 women and children to be evacuated and by providing support for overstressed staff at a domestic violence shelter for women and children. These clubs were Sierra Vista South and Yuma Foothills.  
 
Two clubs recognized the need to care for homeless and unaccompanied youth making it possible for them to graduate. These clubs were Catalina (Tucson) and Tucson Sunrise.
 
From Yuma to Douglas, from Globe to Rio Rico, Rotary funds are making a huge difference in local communities. We keep rediscovering who we are as members of Rotary clubs in Southern Arizona.
 
 
YIR,
Richie
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
 
 
     Announcements: The Marana Chamber of Commerce’s 20 for ’20 Guide to Marana is out. We encourage you to give a good look. Our Marana Rotary Board Meeting is moved to Wednesday, March 11, at John Dooling’s office.
     Happy bucks given for: Grateful for family (Carl); a Science Fair-winning daughter (David); attending Peter’s Citizenship Ceremony and trip to Antarctica (Don); feeling like “I really belong here” at our Rotary meetings (Peter) and passing his pilot’s flight physical (Harold, 54 years and counting).
     Javier Avalos of Spectrum Ina Road Auto Collision was our guest speaker and spoke to us about the demand for auto and collision repair technicians. Dramatic changes in the automobile industry, such as electric cars and hi-tech bells and whistles, present challenges to the automotive and collision repair shops. Newer cars have from 32 to 40 computerized components that require technicians to test, not guess, what repairs need addressing, Javier said.
     To keep up with the technological advances, the county needs a robust J-Ted and J-Tech programs to train prospective high school graduates in auto and collision repair. Starting salaries range from $35,000 to $40,000, and five years’ experience could lead to salaries exceeding $75,000. New technology – self-parking cars, self-driving cars – is here and someone needs to be able to fix the technology, Javier explained. The good news is that Pima Community College broke ground in November 2019 on a new J-Tech facility for its Automotive Technology and Innovation Center.
     Thank you, Javier, not only for your longtime support of the Marana Rotary, but also for your 30-plus years of business leadership.
Laura Clymer, Secretary
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
Marana Rotary Round-Up for 2/4/20
   Announcements: Our very own John Zwick celebrated his 55th (Yes, 55th!) year in Rotary this month. Congratulations, John. Peter and Beckie observed birthdays this week. Happy Birthday! With only 29 days in February this month, it should be easy to wear your Rotary pin every day. Consider yourself challenged. Ever clever John Dooling noted that Peter, our resident stargazer, stabilized the precariously perched projector with tape and commented: “It still doesn’t work but we can see the farthest points of the universe.” Indeed!
   Happy bucks given for: our visitor Martin, Bob Bishop’s return, MCAT’s success (on track to have 100 grads in May), bicycle riding, shooting stars and the night sky.
    MCAT Principal Denise Coronado introduced Student of the Month Bright Cox, who attended breakfast with her mom Summer Cox. After struggling academically at MHS, Bright found her place at MCAT where she’s consistently been on the on Honor Roll. Bright thanked her mom for always being her ally. Bright has been a model of persistence and perseverance at MCAT. She hopes to  become a dental assistant after graduating from MCAT.
   Our final presentation about a microloan program in Hermosillo, Mexico came from our own Randy Brooks and fellow Rotarian Gary Friedman. Randy and Gary traveled to Mexico to learn more about the Sonora Mexico Rotary Microcredit program. They visited 10 businesses whose owners have used the microloan program to start-up various businesses, such as selling cheese, tortillas, cosmetics, and clothing.
   In existence for about 12 years, the program is the No. 1 microcredit source in Sonora, Mexico. FinReg, a for-profit financial institution services the microloans (up to $500). FinReg looks for potential borrowers in the rural parts of the northern Mexican state. A group of borrowers consists of five to seven aspiring entrepreneurs. The program teaches participants how to run a business, the cost of credit, product pricing, and how to calculate income, expenses and losses. Ninety percent of the borrowers are women; 70 percent live in rural areas, and 70 percent renew their loans.
Marana Rotary Round-Up for 2/11/20
   Announcements: John Dooling reported the PETS (President-elect Training Seminar) held in Los Angeles was a compelling program that was very well done. “A lot of effort went into the program,” John added. Of note, coming up: Rotary Day of Peace on April 4 (register here: https://rotaryd5500.org/Stories/day-of-peace-april-4-2020 ) and Rotarians at Work Day on April 25.
   Happy bucks given for: Gem Show (traffic) almost over, visits from extended family, desert rains (and subsequent desert blooms), Mary’s cookies, playing music with The Defenders, and swinging golf clubs on your birthday.
   We welcomed Rotarian visitor Tom from Burton, MI., who shared a bit about his club. Tom, a Rotarian since 1983, retired after 34 years as an educator. His club raises about $5,000 each year through a “feast” where tickets are sold for $125.
   Our own Bob Bishop was honored for becoming a Paul Harris Fellow, which signifies that he’s given a total of $1,000 to the Rotary Foundation. “I’m very happy to give to a group that actually helps people,” Bob said.
   Club president Richie Benner, field director for the Catalina Council of Scouts, BSA, shared the latest developments of the Boy Scouts organization, including the launch of new programs for girls, the exit of the LDS church youth, and the likely filing of Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Richie also described the variety of programs offered, including Sea Scouts, Venturing, Exploring, and STEM Scouts, and noted that local Eagle Scouts contributed 30,000 hours of community service projects last year alone.
Marana Rotary Round-Up for 2/18/20
   Announcements: Peter Mack’s Citizenship Ceremony is set for 1:30 p.m. on February 21.
   Happy bucks given for: Wine festivals, sold-out cookie booths (way to go, Beckie), beautiful mornings, the U.S. Naval Observatories in Chile and Flagstaff, Shelter Box, our Navy visitors, and the glorious weather.
   U.S. Navy Commander Douglas Pratt, commanding officer of the USS Tucson, told us about the primary missions of the fast-tact submarine and its crew. The USS Tucson is home-ported at Pearl Harbor. At sea 70 percent of the time, the USS Tucson conducts reconnaissance, surveillance, and special forces operations for the Navy.
   The enduring mission of the U.S. Navy is to promote and protect peace, CDR Pratt said. One of the primary missions is to keep sea lanes open for trade. CDR Pratt noted that 26 percent of U.S. jobs are tied to global trade, 26 percent of U.S. manufacturing depends on exports, and 20 percent of U.S. agricultural products are sold overseas. Currently, the Navy has 290 ships in its battle force, with hopes of adding another 65 ships. Primary areas of concern include the South China Sea and the Black Sea.
   Joining CDR Pratt were LTJG Alan Schaefer and LT Jacqui Maxwell.
Marana Rotary Round-Up for 2/25/20
   Announcements: Registrations for Tour de Cookie are behind last year at this time. Please do what you can to promote the race. Upcoming dates of importance: April 4, Rotary Day of Peace; April 18, Four-Way Test speech contest; and April 25, Rotarians at Work Day. President Richie Benner handed out a list of possible community service projects for us to consider.
   Happy bucks given for: Poker night winnings; watching the Rodeo Parade with grandchildren; remembering “Show Tuesday” and the famous Pancake Race in Liberal, KS; applying for an American passport; and glorious weather.
   Former engineers Phil and Nancy Rink shared with us their “novel” approach to writing books that target fifth- to eighth-graders who have difficulty reading. Phil has written and self-published nine “Jimi & Isaac” books, which boast “big ideas using little words” and promote the importance of problem solving. Big publishing houses focus mostly on literary books and books that can be “marketed”, Phil said. Phil wants the books to be similar to the “Tom Swift” book series from 1910 to 1941. The “Jimi & Isaac” books are about 125 pages and use short words and sentences to encourage young readers.
 
Submitted by Laura Clymer, secretary
RTEP Final Results
 
The Ride to End Polio (RTEP) results are in!  We raised $4,930,956 in the Ride To End Polio 2019.  Here’s the breakdown...
 
$822,805 in cash contributions (EndPolio.org, Rotary Ideas, Facebook and checks mailed in)
$410,423.13 in District Designated Funds
$410,423.13 in World Fund Match
Total - $1,643,652.00 (No Gates match)
$4,930,956.00 with the Gates match
 
That puts our cumulative total at $58,233,506! Truly Amazing!  Great job District 5500 for putting on such an amazing, International event!
 
We had a total of 120 riders riding on behalf of Rotary in the road ride.  Much thanks goes out to those 120 riders.  And, we cannot forget our wonderful Indoor riders.  The 357 Indoor riders raised $101,142(not including any matches).  Even though El Tour did not host an Indoor ride, Charlotte Harris did.  Thank you Charlotte for orchestrating and organizing such a successful Indoor ride this year!
 
So, what’s new for 2020? Well, change is in the air.  We have already booked the new Pre-Ride Dinner location in the Atrium at the Viscount Suites on Broadway.  Plus, we will have a block of rooms there for any out-of-towners who want to stay close to the action.  We are working on a new fundraising platform, there will be a new route for the Ride, and many more improvements.  So, stay tuned and keep an eye on the Ride To End Polio webpage for updates.
 
Thank you to everyone who helped make the RTEP 2019 such an amazing District-wide event and success.
 
Natasha Wrae
District RTEP Chair
 
 
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
Announcements: With four members celebrating birthdays, we opened the meeting with a robust singing of “Happy Birthday.” President Richie Benner noted that he, Denise West and Laura Clymer participated the Rotary Leadership Institute training on January 25, and Mary Straus served on the faculty. Richie and Denise have completed two of three sessions. Rotary Community Service Day will be April 25, so save the date and mark your calendar.
 
Happy bucks for: Our our guests, personalized “Happy Birthday” serenades from Carl Maes, beautiful weather (compared to Alaska this time of year), the approaching Gem Show, and an upcoming citizenship ceremony (2/21/20) for our own Peter Mack who somehow duped us ;) into letting him become a citizen. I will vouch that our country is getting the better end of this deal. Let’s just hope we can keep up our end in these precarious times.
 
Guest speakers: We welcomed back U.S. Border Patrol officers Jesus Vasavilbaso and Sergio Leones Jr. Both are assigned to the Tucson Sector, which runs for 262 linear miles along our border with Mexico from the Pima County line to the New Mexico state line. A total of 3,900 agents with the federal government patrol the sector.
 
Vasavilbaso and Leones noted some of the arrests and drug seizures that have been made recently and made public through news releases. Additionally, as of December 25, 2019, the Border Patrol had rescued 243 crossers for the year. The Tucson Sector has 34 rescue beacons, which can be activated by desperate or abandoned crossers.
 
Vasavilbaso also explained that drug cartels often control how, when, and where undocumented immigrants are going to cross the border. The cartels target vulnerable people who want to immigrate to the States for a better life, Vasavilbaso said. The population of crossers has changed as well with more people from destabilized and violent Central American countries. The officers also noted that they are seeing an uptick in dubious claims from the crossers seeking asylum with children, prompting immigration officials to conduct DNA-swab tests to verify whether the minors crossing with adults have familial ties.
 
Finally, the officers noted the decrease over the last 10 years in marijuana seizures as compared to the dramatic increase in narcotic seizures as drug cartels increase their efforts to push heroin and fentanyl into the U.S. Presumably this is to capitalize on the opioid crisis, fueled in part by the over-prescribing of pain medication that was marketed aggressively by pharmaceutical giants, as pain med-addicts turned to heroin and fentanyl.
 
Submitted by Laura Clymer, secretary
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
We had the pleasure of welcoming a visiting Rotarian all the way from London, Tony Sharma, DG for Rotary District 1130. Tony felt right at home as Mother Nature delivered a steady, driving rain during our breakfast meeting.
Tony told us about two service projects that his Rotary club has sponsored: 1) a global grant which set up a fire station in Ethiopia using a refurbished fire truck; and 2) a double-decker “Shelter Bus” which travels around London and makes various stops to provide food, clothing and counseling to the homeless. The “upstairs” of the bus has clothes that the clients can pick out for themselves. Impressive projects, no doubt.
 
Announcements included:
  • Our members authorized to contribute $1,000 to the Oro Valley Club’s global grant once it gets approved.
  • President Richie Benner, Program Director Denise West, and your humble secretary are signed up to attend the Rotary Leadership Institute. Mary Straus is on the faculty.
  • Randy Brooks is traveling to Mexico to check out the microloans program.
  • Tour de Cookie is set for March 14. Dan Contorno, our tour de force of tour de cookie, asked for folks to help out on Sundays prior to the race. Dan is setting up a table at 9 a.m. along the Loop at Rillito Racetrack to hand out information to riders.
Happy Bucks flowed for the rain, the rain, and the rain. And more bucks showered down for our visitor from the U.K., our own Carl Maes for speaking about the “Secure Act”, for visits from children and grandchildren, for hikes, and jazz concerts.
 
Lynne’s joke was lighthearted and garnered laughs and a few groans: “I went to see my financial planner and asked him to check my balance. He tried to push me over.”
 
Carl Maes, our resident financial planner, presented information about the “Secure Act”, which went into effect January 1, 2020. While the long-term implications are still being determined, Carl said one of the main take-aways is the increase in age for the required minimum distribution from 70 ½ to 72. Additionally, you can keep contributing pre-tax dollars into a traditional IRA or Roth until age 72.
 
The Secure Act also increased the incentive (from a $500 to a $5,000 tax credit) for small businesses to start-up retirement plans for employees. If you have questions or need more detail about how the Secure Act impacts your small business, check in with Carl.
 
Carl also reminded us that it is important that you update your beneficiaries because many of the changes could end up affecting them.
 
Submitted by Laura Clymer, secretary.
Rotary Club of Marana
 
                                                                            
 
 
At our breakfast meeting we joyously welcomed back Bouba Hamadon, who was in town visiting and to express his appreciation for the successful securing of the global grant for the Malam Center in Cameroon.
 
“I’m here to acknowledge the hard work of the club for the global grant, and in particular Mary (Straus) and Randy (Brooks),” Bouba said. “Now the burden is on us. Thank you on behalf of the village the Rotary Club in Maroua. We appreciate the help and the commitment.”
 
An additional $4,000 from us will go Malam School Center project, and Marana Rotary President Richie Benner presented that check to Bouba as well.
 
Announcements from our merry morning included:
  • Rotary Leadership Institute will be January 25. There’s still time to sign up.
  • Tour de Cookie sponsorships are available. Dan handed out fliers to post.
  • The Rotary Day of Peace will be April 4, 2020, so be on the lookout for more information about how to participate.
  • In a special announcement, club member Don Jorgensen was “pinned” for becoming a Paul Harris Society member.
We doled out “Happy Bucks” for seeing grandchildren, for completing the first international trip of the year (Peter Mack, of course), for Bouba’s visit, for the Rotary Foundation, and for feeling like “it’s home here” at the Marana Rotary club meetings (Bouba).
 
Deputy Pima County Attorney Jonathan Mosher returned for another presentation in his series, “How Not to Get Away with Murder.” This time, the featured case was “State v. Joshua Lelevier”. Lelevier of Vail was convicted of first-degree murder of his 13-year-old stepdaughter. Mosher, who is running in the Democratic primary to replace retiring County Prosecutor Barbara LaWall, emphasized how the county attorney’s office is using technology to create a visual story of what happened for jurors.
 
Submitted by Laura Clymer, secretary. This version corrects three mistakes in the first version sent out. My apologies.
 
 
 
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Member-at-Large
Program Director
Member-at-Large
Membership
Service Projects
The Rotary Foundation
Marana Rotary Foundation
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Newsletter Editor
Youth Service
 

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